uppertiers

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

personaljamz

collectorandco:

kamakura / yohey23 / flickr

collectorandco:

kamakura / yohey23 / flickr

anaispaws:

EMOJI NATION : Nastya Ptichek


Nastya Ptichek is an Ukrainian artist, who liked to play around with her phone, when she realized that most of the emojis she’d been using begun to look like well-known artworks. She decided to pair the emojis with famous paintings for a series she’s titled “Emoji Nation”. She later on moved from emojis to including prominent icons from Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

regardintemporel:

Alois Kolb (1875 - 1942) - Beethoven, ca. 1900

regardintemporel:

Alois Kolb (1875 - 1942) - Beethoven, ca. 1900

Comparison Essay

Joseph S. Pearlman

Contrast/Comparison Essay

While Hollywood has always made Music movies, the origin story of a musician played out as a pseudo-autobiography has become one of the most successful ways to bring the drama. In 1984, “Purple Rain” brought Prince into the mainstream for the first time, showcasing his many talents and leaving him on the top of the charts for the rest of the decade. As a victory lap for Eminem, 2002’s “8 Mile” capitalized on three years of huge success for the artist and the movie was icing on the cake.  Two very different artists tell a very similar story, as if “8 Mile” is the biblical Flood of Noah in the Old Testament and “Purple Rain” is the Flood tale in Sumerian culture, an older recounting of possibly the same story.

“Purple Rain” takes the audience to the city of Minneapolis where there is a huge live music scene. Prince plays The Kid whose band The Revolution is up and coming talent. The film follows Prince’s character on his purple motorcycle, most importantly back home where his alcoholic father is verbally and physically abusive towards The Kid and his mother. No one at home thinks he can make it in the music world. The Kid’s rival is another performer named Morris Day who has a lockdown on the Minneapolis scene, with the power of keeping Prince as a second tier act and/or replacing him altogether. Morris Day also persuades Prince’s girlfriend, an aspiring singer named Apollonia to leave Prince and join up with a girl-group Day is putting together. This leaves Prince’s character abandoned yet again. But The Kid comes out on top at the finale of the Battle of the Bands against Morris Day. The Kid and the Revolution pummel the crowd with a ballad- “Purple Rain.” It leaves the crowd hypnotized and completely won over. The Kid essentially rides off into the sunset as the newest sensation in Minneapolis and a champion for the underdog.

In “8 Mile,” the audience is transported to a tough neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan. Introduced there is a working class kid named B-Rabbit played by Eminem. His family life is shattered; he lives in a trailer park with a baby sister, his alcoholic mother, and her sometime present but abusive boyfriend. Eminem’s character is trying to change his situation through his natural gifts with words by making a dent in the Detroit rap scene. B-Rabbit has a rival group he must go up against at the end, who also manhandle his girlfriend at some point leaving him abandoned. Eminem’s character comes out on top in the end. In the final round of a freestyle battle against the rival group’s leader Papa Doc, B-Rabbit turns the punch line insults on himself, making fun of his skin color (white) in an African American scene and how much of a loser he is- leaving nothing for Papa Doc to retaliate with in the next round. B-Rabbit essentially rides off into the sunset (or walks down an alley with a garbage bag of his clothes) as the newest sensation in Detroit and a champion for the underdog.

Both movies were tour de forces for these musicians. Even though the landscapes of Minneapolis and Detroit differ, as well as pop-rock from hip hop, we still have an underdog, with his family life less to be desired of.  A girlfriend swooped away by his enemy. The protagonist involved in a ‘showdown ending’ where everything is at stake. The protagonist’s moment of clarity where he rises above his underdog status, winning the day and riding off. Our mythologies are born out of reluctant heroes who rise to the challenge, but they never sound as good as they do in these two Music movies.

lifeonmars70s:

Nancy Sinatra

lifeonmars70s:

Nancy Sinatra